No Pardon for Susan B. Anthony


26 Aug
26Aug






Perhaps on the centennial of women’s right to vote, Susan B. Anthony would be the likely historical woman to grant a pardon for her past legal transgression. However, The Susan B. Anthony museum rejected President’s Trump’s pardon citing the reason that Anthony was proud of her illegally cast vote and indeed wishes that to be part of her legacy.


And while on the surface her leadership for voting rights seems innocuous, it does not take much unveiling to discover that Susan B. Anthony was far from saintly in her mission and that racist intents tainted  her quest for the women’s victory. 


The very Susan B. Anthony that is praised by women was outraged that a former male slave would be allowed to vote before a white woman, saying, “I will cut off this right arm of mine before before I will ask for the ballot for the Negro and not the woman.” 


Those same racist sentiments extended beyond the black male and reveals how Anthony and fellow suffragists felt about the Negro woman as well. In the actual march of 1913 Negro women were relegated to back of parade by Susan B. Anthony and the white suffragists organizers. 


Later during the sixties when the new wave of feminism was ushered in, black and white women remained divided causing many black women to form their own feiminist organizations. 


Now in our current century where the denouncement of racism is the liberal battle cry, Hilary Clinton belied her sincerity by wearing an all-white suit to accept the presidential nomination, a color that clearly evoked a time when white suffragists refused to allow black women to walk beside them in a suffragists parade. 


In similar allegiance to these past acts of white female superiority over blacks, it was who Meryl Streep spoke volumes when she wore the  t-shirt announcing, “I would rather be that she would rather be a rebel than a slave.” 


So it is clear that the theme of bigotry and white superiority has has lasted up until today and is now intertwined with yet another group of marginalized women who are ignored and shut out of the process. 


Homeless women who endure some of the most dehumanizing experiences of out time remain absent from any feminist agenda and elitism remains a constant even within black feminist organizations.


The women’s March on Washington saw throngs of women enjoying the fruits of early laborers while marching joyfully through the street in pink pussy hats oblivious to the needs of the truly oppressed woman. 


From Los Angeles to Washington, D.C these women proceeded through the streets unaffected by the condition of women who were weathered on the by-ways.

There were no homeless women on the platform. The heavily  media- sponsored idea of what determines diversity was devoid of woman who remain voiceless.

Just as the possession of women who marched at the start of the century there was no place in the parade for those who whose life statuses deemed them unworthy of representation --- the women who were sitting on the Washington and Los Angeles streets lacking critical element of human dignity. 


Again, there was a gaping hole of exclusion and as in the past, the rallying cry was dominated by an upper middle class white feminist agenda parading itself as being representative of all women. As a homeless female, I did not hear my voice and as this era dictates, no one spoke for me.

Had they realized the significance of representation they might have invited Tiffany Haddish who knows the trials of emerging from America’s worst crisis as a female. There could have been Lizzo or those countless other women who are either on the streets or have emerged victorious to tell our stories.


As in the past, those who control the feminist narrative of our times remain oblivious to the needs of others. Homelessness is a very real and present plight affecting millions of women yet upper middle class liberal women remain the center of attention as they assemble in large protesting numbers for women's rights.


So Susan B. Anthony’s biggest crime was not in casting an illegal vote, but for setting a precedent that refuses to allow the inclusion of every woman. She may be pardoned for not paying a fine, but there is no pardon for a legacy that set the tone for the blatant omission of women from every segment of society to stand up and have their voices heard.



 













 Perhaps on the centennial of women’s right to vote, Susan B. Anthony would be the likely historical woman to grant a pardon for her past legal transgression. However, The Susan B. Anthony museum rejected President’s Trump’s pardon citing tthat Anthony was proud of her illegally cast vote and indeed wishes that to be part of her legacy.

And while on the surface her leadership for voting rights seems innocuous, it does not take much unveiling to discover that Susan B. Anthony was far from saintly in her mission and that racist intents tainted  her quest for the women’s victory. 

The very Susan B. Anthony that is praised by women was outraged that a former male slave would be allowed to vote before a white woman, saying, “I will cut off this right arm of mine before before I will ask for the ballot for the Negro and not the woman.” 

Those same racist sentiments extended beyond the black male and reveals how Anthony and fellow suffragists felt about the Negro woman as well. In the actual march of 1913 Negro women were relegated to back of parade by Susan B. Anthony and the white suffragists organizers. 


Later during the sixties when the new wave of feminism was ushered in, black and white women remained divided causing many black women to form their own feiminist organizations. 


Now in our current century where the denouncement of racism is the liberal battle cry, Hilary Clinton perhaps belied her sincerity by wearing an all-white suit to accept the presidential nomination, a color that clearly evoked a time when white suffragists refused to allow black women to walk beside them in a suffragists parade. 


In similar allegiance to these past acts of white female superiority,  it was who Meryl Streep spoke volumes when she wore the  t-shirt announcing, “I would rather be that she would rather be a rebel than a slave.” 


So it is clear that the theme of bigotry and white superiority has has lasted up until today and is now intertwined with yet another group of marginalized women who are ignored and shut out of the process. 


Homeless women who endure some of the most dehumanizing experiences of our time remain absent from any feminist agenda where even within black feminist organizations elitism remains a constant.


The women’s March on Washington saw throngs of women enjoying the fruits of early laborers while marching joyfully through the street in pink pussy hats oblivious to the needs of the truly oppressed woman. 

From Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., these women proceeded through the streets unaffected by the condition of women who were weathered on the by-ways.

There were no homeless women on the platform. The heavily media- sponsored idea of what determines diversity was devoid of woman who remain voiceless.

Just as there was no place for those whose color deemed them unworthy of representation over a century ago,  there was no place in the parades now for women  whose life statuses caste them unworthy of representation ---those women  sitting on the Washington and Los Angeles streets lacking critical element of human dignity. 


Again, there was a gaping hole of exclusion and as in the past, the rallying cry was dominated by an upper middle class white feminist agenda parading itself as being representative of all women. As a homeless female, I did not hear my voice and as this era dictates, no one spoke for me.

Had they realized the significance of representation there might have been a Tiffany Haddish who to speak on the stag. A woman  who knows the trials of emerging from America’s worst crisis as a female. There could have been Lizzo or those countless other women who are either on the streets or have emerged victorious to tell our stories.


As in the past, those who control the feminist narrative of our times remain oblivious to the needs of others. Homelessness is a very real and present plight affecting millions of women yet upper middle class women on the left remain the center of attention as they assemble in large protesting numbers.


So Susan B. Anthony’s biggest crime was not in refusing to pay the fine of $10, but for setting the lingering precedent that refuses to allow every woman to have her voice heard. She may be pardoned for not paying a fine, but there is no pardon or excuse for the obvious lack of inclusion for every woman who needs representation. 




 




























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